My apology for a late blog; I became occupied with a family matter, then time was critical.

Its 351 days to Memorial Day. The status of Harley Tracks Tales is the only factor to determine how I will attend the next Rolling Thunder. My hope is to join the NVAR riders in California for the full ride. The ride across America and gathering in Washington D.C. are powerful events. I was honored to be counted among those in attendance demanding our government account for, and retrieve, POW’s and MIA’s from all wars. Its also a time to acknowledge and pay respect to all veterans. Sunday’s Protest Ride rolled out of the Pentagon parking lots for four hours. A message carried on the soulful beat of thunderous motorcycles filled the atmosphere of D.C. – over half million people together for the same reason is a humbling, and encouraging experience.

On Monday morning (Memorial Day), Mike and I saluted the departure of the remaining group we had grown close to on our ride. Then, I called my parents, and thanked Dad for his service. I bid Mike farewell and left on my solo ride north. The air was crisp, but the sunshine was brilliant for an enjoyable ride to NYC. After squeezing through a traffic jam before the Holland Tunnel, I rolled, without further delay, through Manhattan, Brooklyn, and right up to my friend’s office in Queens. Not bad for a first time entry. (Kenny Lee was working overtime on this sacred holiday.) Other than a little grey on each of our heads, he looked no different than 13 years ago when we worked together in South China. After two nights of visiting, with a rainy day trip to Ground Zero and Central Park in between, I left with the intention to blog from Boston. Continue reading

Words from D.C. What a week.

So many Vet Homes, Hospitals, schools, hotels, and meals. I’ve never eaten so much on a road trip.record. This morning we rode over 70 strong through the mountains of West Virginia and Maryland, in a steady drizzle and heavy fog, at 70 mph. And it was cold too, but all part of the adventure. It’s rides like that, that make others more enjoyable. Hosts were ready for us at the Maryland Veterans Cemetery, where we laid another wreath, as we have each day. Silence, before each lone bugler plays taps, commands a focused attention to itself. Thoughts of a life taken pass between the first and last notes, and then a moment of silence returns.

We rode into DC over 70 strong without any formal escort, or incident. Arlington National Cemetery was the first stop for another wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Actually, there are remains of unknown soldiers from WW I, WW II, and the Korean War. Thanks to DNA testing, the remains of a Vietnam Veteran were identified in 1998 and returned per his families wishes. Few people ever set foot into the protected area of the Tomb, and it was a great honor for four of our riders to pay this tribute. Taps followed the setting of the wreath. Continue reading