I trust everyone is enjoying a good summer, warmer and dryer in some places than others, but enjoying the spirit none the less.

I’m not getting all the riding I did last year, or the year before that, but I’ve been out and about on some well attended memorial and appreciation rides. And, most of all, enjoying the unblemished highways of America. It’s great to see the highway department out there doing a fantastic job with upgrades and repairs. First off, on my return from a run across American, and Canada, in June, I paid final respects to my old friend Jim who lost out to the friggin Grim Reaper. You gave him a battle and pissed him off before going. RIP Jim.

Weekends to follow I laid tracks with a club up to the Fond du Lac Indian Reservation near Duluth MN for a Veteran Recognition and Appreciation Powwow. They put on a great event true to their culture for recognizing warriors. This was their 20th year for the Powwow. Close to a thousand people camped out to attend the event. 256 veterans were honored one by one. Drums pounded as songs and tales were shouted in their native tongue praising the spirit of the warrior. Throughout the day everyone joined in the traditional dances. It was a true and sincere show of respect from America’s first warriors. Continue reading

My apology for a late blog; I became occupied with a family matter, then time was critical.

Its 351 days to Memorial Day. The status of Harley Tracks Tales is the only factor to determine how I will attend the next Rolling Thunder. My hope is to join the NVAR riders in California for the full ride. The ride across America and gathering in Washington D.C. are powerful events. I was honored to be counted among those in attendance demanding our government account for, and retrieve, POW’s and MIA’s from all wars. Its also a time to acknowledge and pay respect to all veterans. Sunday’s Protest Ride rolled out of the Pentagon parking lots for four hours. A message carried on the soulful beat of thunderous motorcycles filled the atmosphere of D.C. – over half million people together for the same reason is a humbling, and encouraging experience.

On Monday morning (Memorial Day), Mike and I saluted the departure of the remaining group we had grown close to on our ride. Then, I called my parents, and thanked Dad for his service. I bid Mike farewell and left on my solo ride north. The air was crisp, but the sunshine was brilliant for an enjoyable ride to NYC. After squeezing through a traffic jam before the Holland Tunnel, I rolled, without further delay, through Manhattan, Brooklyn, and right up to my friend’s office in Queens. Not bad for a first time entry. (Kenny Lee was working overtime on this sacred holiday.) Other than a little grey on each of our heads, he looked no different than 13 years ago when we worked together in South China. After two nights of visiting, with a rainy day trip to Ground Zero and Central Park in between, I left with the intention to blog from Boston. Continue reading

41,000 miles across Vietnam in Faith and Honor, with a playful Vengeance.

 

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